El bolero de ravel original

El bolero de ravel original

Liên khúc bolero

Portrait of Ida Rubinstein (1885-1960), Russian dancer and wealthy patron of the arts, who inspired the Boléro and who premiered the work on November 22, 1928. Tempera and charcoal painting by Valentin Serov (1910).
I pointed out to Ravel that this project could unfortunately not be viable due to the fact that the pieces by Albéniz were already orchestrated by Arbós for a ballet intended for La Argentina (it was the ballet Triana,[10] given the following season with the known success)… Who is this Arbós… And what to say to Ida? She will be furious!
Ravel accepted, with not much pleasure, Benois’ staging, but, personally, he asked his friend Léon Leyritz – the sculptor who made the bust of Ravel that adorns the lobby of the Paris Opera – to prepare another scenography more in line with his ideas. That production would see the light of day, but it would no longer be in Ravel’s lifetime.[20] The orchestral version of the opera was to be performed by the orchestra.
The orchestral version of the work was also premiered in Paris, on January 11, 1930, with Ravel conducting the orchestra of the «Concerts Lamoureux». It is said that during the orchestral premiere of Boléro, a lady was disturbed in her seat exclaiming, «Au fou! Au fou!» («Au fou! Au fou!»). Recounting the scene to his brother, Ravel would have said, «That one, that one got it.»[21].

8:27ravel’s bolero, amazing flashmob! (spain)societat musical d’algemesíyoutube – feb 24, 2013

Portrait of Ida Rubinstein (1885-1960), Russian dancer and wealthy patron of the arts, who inspired Boléro and who premiered the work on November 22, 1928. Tempera and charcoal painting by Valentin Serov (1910).
I pointed out to Ravel that this project could unfortunately not be viable due to the fact that the pieces by Albéniz were already orchestrated by Arbós for a ballet intended for La Argentina (it was the ballet Triana,[10] given the following season with the known success)…. Who is this Arbós… And what to say to Ida? She will be furious!
Ravel accepted, with not much pleasure, Benois’ staging, but, personally, he asked his friend Léon Leyritz – the sculptor who made the bust of Ravel that adorns the lobby of the Paris Opera – to prepare another scenography more in line with his ideas. That production would see the light of day, but it would no longer be in Ravel’s lifetime.[20] The orchestral version of the opera was to be performed by the orchestra.
The orchestral version of the work was also premiered in Paris, on January 11, 1930, with Ravel conducting the orchestra of the «Concerts Lamoureux». It is said that during the orchestral premiere of Boléro, a lady was disturbed in her seat exclaiming, «Au fou! Au fou!» («Au fou! Au fou!»). Recounting the scene to his brother, Ravel would have said, «That one, that one got it.»[21].

Maurice ravelcompositor francés

Boléro es una obra orquestal de un solo movimiento del compositor francés Maurice Ravel (1875-1937). Compuesta originalmente como un ballet por encargo de la actriz y bailarina rusa Ida Rubinstein, la pieza, estrenada en 1928, es la composición musical más famosa de Ravel[1].
Mientras estaba de vacaciones en St Jean-de-Luz, Ravel se acercó al piano y tocó una melodía con un dedo a su amigo Gustave Samazeuilh, diciendo «¿No crees que este tema tiene una cualidad insistente? Voy a intentar repetirlo varias veces sin ningún desarrollo, aumentando gradualmente la orquesta lo mejor que pueda»[2] Se ha sugerido que este inusual interés por la repetición fue causado por la aparición de una afasia progresiva[3].
La composición tuvo un éxito sensacional cuando se estrenó en la Ópera de París el 22 de noviembre de 1928, con coreografía de Bronislava Nijinska y diseños y escenario de Alexandre Benois. La orquesta de la Ópera fue dirigida por Walther Straram. Originalmente, Ernest Ansermet había sido contratado para dirigir durante toda la temporada de ballet, pero los músicos se negaron a tocar bajo su dirección[5]. En el programa del estreno se imprimió un escenario de Rubinstein y Nijinska:[5].

7:10flashmob philharmonic orchestra of toluca, bolero by ravelgerardo urbán y fernándezyoutube – aug 14, 2013

Maurice Ravel is one of the most important French composers of the 20th century, being considered one of the great masters of orchestration, that is, of the art of combining the different instruments of the orchestra in a musical composition.
At this point comes a part in which Ravel experiments with different instrumental combinations, with the full orchestra playing at full volume, to end with a series of discordant sounds that, as if it were an explosion of sound, mark the agitated end of the work.
Having analyzed it musically, let’s talk about how this work was conceived, since it is a combination of two of Ravel’s personal characteristics, his passion for challenges and his disinclination to overwork.
In 1901 he entered the Grand Prix de Rome, the winning of which was a guarantee of the winner’s official consecration. He won the second prize with a cantata entitled Myrrha, written in a style that sought to adapt to the conservative tastes of the jury and that did not at all correspond to the style Ravel explored in works such as the pianistic Jeux d’eau, in which he drew new sonorities from the piano’s high register.